The Castlegar Study on Homelessness and Labour Mobility

Intersection

What would it look like if all of the people who are marginalized; the homeless, the impoverished, the traumatized, those with diverse abilities, those with mental health issues, the youth and the aged; what would it look like if all could participate in society with dignity?

We have dared to suppose that Castlegar could be a model of prosperity, if we had a means of making that happen.

Because this issue is truly the intersection of social policy and economics.

We can make this work.

Contact

PHONE: 250-365-2104

EMAIL: Hugh.mcgillivray@cdcss.ca

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Labour Mobility in a Rural Setting

Results

Major Findings:

  • labour mobility is sensitive to social needs, and therefore to perceptions of risk and economic downturn. This sensitivity appears to be reciprocal in action, and central to productivity.
  • Productivity is a mechanism by which economic depression is mediated. This also seems to be a reciprocal relationship.
  • Housing shortages play a central role in labour mobility.
  • Housing and labour mobility are strongly influenced by local and regional policies.
  • Policies are reciprocally influenced by perceptions of community dialogues, but not equally so.
  • Perceptions of community dialogues tend to be mediated and moderated by the media, but also by dialogues within the community.
  • There appears to be a multi-level interaction between national, provincial, and local dialogues.

 

Recommendations:

  • That each community foster and promote a community-centric culture. This idea replaces the out-dated ‘every man for himself’ narrative that still pervades Canadian culture.
  • That each community should alter dialogues of homelessness and poverty to dialogues of productivity and labour mobility. Removing the stigma makes these pervasive issues into what amount to problem-solving exercises.
  • That each community resolve the housing crisis by creating a more fluid and sustainable inventory of rentals and market housing.
  • That the research community in general should conduct further inquiries into the global aspects of dialogue in terms of how they impact local economies.

The Survey is complete. Thank you for your participation.

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